August 18, 2020

Best Ways to Detect and Treat Carpet Beetles

Carpet beetles in Australia are part of the ecosystem and pose no problem in their natural environment where their larvae eat animal proteins, feathers, animal skins and hair. The problem is that the list includes some of your possessions like fabrics and wool in carpets and your clothes!

You might find it hard to believe but it only takes one single Australian carpet beetle to do a whole lot of damage to your home, furniture and clothing. If you see one, you can bet 50 to 100 eggs are waiting somewhere in a rug or carpet or the edges of your home to be hatched.

So if just one carpet beetle can cause havoc, imagine what 20 of them could do! They only need a clump of pet hair that the vacuum cleaner can’t access underneath the lounge to lay eggs and make an easy nest that will be hard to detect. One of the best ways to treat carpet beetles is prevention!

What Do Australian Carpet Beetles Look Like?

The Australian carpet beetle species measure about 3mm long and can be up to 5mm during the larvae stage. They’re a tiny furry beetle and are a distant cousin to several other kinds of moths and carpet beetles. These pests might be roughly the size of a pinhead and look like fuzzy, harmless little things, but they can add more worry to your life with the enormous damage they can do. Carpet beetles are hard to detect, which is why a carpet beetle larvae inspection is advisable.

These hungry little insects don’t attack or bite humans, but their fuzz can cause an allergic reaction such as a rash or dermatitis, which is rare, but if you were allergic it would only add to the infestation problem. These tiny beetles can find their way into the pile in your wool carpets and rugs and leave bald, unsightly patches in the material. Yes, we wish carpet beetles would stay in the bush where their larvae can eat whatever they want, but the warmth and protection in your house is a good place for the species of adult beetles to lay their eggs and create nests so that the larvae have plenty to feed on for their supper.

Beetles, larvae and other insect species can shed skins and eggs all over your home, especially in dark places indoors that are warm and full of dust that can accommodate them for long periods of time, which can result in areas getting infested.

Carpet Beetles

How to Detect Carpet Beetles and Carpet Beetle Larvae

Knowing where to look is the first step in knowing how to detect carpet beetles. The life cycle of a carpet beetle from a baby to an adult is fairly quick, which is why an infestation can occur in no time at all if areas are left untreated. Carpet beetles and larvae can often be found on clothes that are made up of natural fibres such as wool and they’re more than happy to eat clothes, which causes holes in the fabric and material, resulting in infested clothes. Beetles feed on fabric, clothing and dead skins around the home, especially when they’re in the larvae stages.

The adult carpet beetle is attracted to light, so they’re often found near window sills and light fixtures. If you see adult carpet beetles in your house, you can bet there’s a nest somewhere and larvae at different stages of growth.

They’re attracted to natural fibres such as carpet but can also munch on :

  • Silk
  • Wool
  • Fresh flowers
  • Pet fur and human hair
  • Paint brushes

Carpet beetles also like synthetic clothing but only if the fibres contain animal or human perspiration, blood, or oil. They eat the pollen and nectar from plants and can be brought inside the house in a bunch of cut flowers. So check any flowers for beetles before you bring them inside. They can also fly through the tiny holes around the edges of windows and can hatch larvae eggs in your home.

Another seemingly unlikely place you can detect carpet beetles is in stored dry foods such as grains, rice and dog food. If you think you might have carpet beetles, check the following, especially rarely used areas in:

  • Carpets
  • Rugs
  • Furniture
  • Blankets
  • Closets, cabinets and pantries
  • Attics
  • Garages
  • Inside air ducts and vents

It’s a good idea also to look inside cases holding musical instruments. The carpet beetle larva can feed on the felt or velvet lining, but also check the padding beneath lamps and furniture legs. The larvae feed on carcases too, so remove any dead rodents and baits that are indoors.

Best Way to Treat Adult Carpet Beetles

To control and treat carpet beetle infestations your first port of call should be a quality pest pest manager whose technicians can detect, treat and control the pests. In between inspections and treatments you should also vacuum often, especially beneath furniture and beds, and anywhere peaceful and dark where the adult beetles lay their eggs and allow them to hatch.

So, how do you prevent a carpet beetle infestation? Here are some tips that could help:

  • Vacuum your home.
  • Steam clean your floors.
  • Wash pillows and bedclothes, cushions, etc.
  • Wipe or spray surfaces with vinegar.
  • Sprinkle borax on carpets.
  • Use an indoor insecticide that targets carpet beetles.

If your Geelong home, company offices or other business premises are being damaged by pest insects such as carpet beetles even after you’ve followed the tips above, you need skilled professional pest manager – call us at Acacia Pest Control!

How to Detect Carpet Beetles and Carpet Beetle Larvae

Knowing where to look is the first step in knowing how to detect carpet beetles. The life cycle of a carpet beetle from a baby to an adult is fairly quick, which is why an infestation can occur in no time at all if areas are left untreated. Carpet beetles and larvae can often be found on clothes that are made up of natural fibres such as wool and they’re more than happy to eat clothes, which causes holes in the fabric and material, resulting in infested clothes. Beetles feed on fabric, clothing and dead skins around the home, especially when they’re in the larvae stages.

The adult carpet beetle is attracted to light, so they’re often found near window sills and light fixtures. If you see adult carpet beetles in your house, you can bet there’s a nest somewhere and larvae at different stages of growth.

They’re attracted to natural fibres such as carpet but can also munch on :

  • Silk
  • Wool
  • Fresh flowers
  • Pet fur and human hair
  • Paint brushes

Carpet beetles also like synthetic clothing but only if the fibres contain animal or human perspiration, blood, or oil. They eat the pollen and nectar from plants and can be brought inside the house in a bunch of cut flowers. So check any flowers for beetles before you bring them inside. They can also fly through the tiny holes around the edges of windows and can hatch larvae eggs in your home.

Another seemingly unlikely place you can detect carpet beetles is in stored dry foods such as grains, rice and dog food. If you think you might have carpet beetles, check the following, especially rarely used areas in:

  • Carpets
  • Rugs
  • Furniture
  • Blankets
  • Closets, cabinets and pantries
  • Attics
  • Garages
  • Inside air ducts and vents

It’s a good idea also to look inside cases holding musical instruments. The carpet beetle larva can feed on the felt or velvet lining, but also check the padding beneath lamps and furniture legs. The larvae feed on carcases too, so remove any dead rodents and baits that are indoors.

Contact Acacia Pest Control Today

Our pest manager stay up to date on all the latest innovations for treating pests such as carpet beetles. At Acacia Pest Control we have professional pest manager near you, so if you have a carpet beetle problem in your home, office or company building, be assured that we specialise in the treatment, and control of all pest and vermin problems in the Geelong area. Our team can also provide you with tips on how to prevent any future infestations so you can keep your property free of insects and pests.

We provide professional pest manager to carry out the treatment for carpet beetle larvae and adult beetles. Call Acacia Pest Control for a quote on 1300 257 774 or send an email to info@acaciapestcontrol.com.au.